Ohaus Aviator 7000 Operating Instructions For Basic Use and Tare Functions

In today’s entry we’re going to provide some very basic operating instructions for the new Ohaus Aviator 7000 retail scale. Of course, once you receive your scale you can immediately use your scale for weighing and selling. Check with your local state weights and measures for the correct procedures for your particular state.

1. Place the item on the scale.
2. Enter the unit price. (enter the unit price as usual without the decimal point, but with all the decimal places)

The price to pay is displayed.

3. Remove the item from the scale.

All displays return to 0.

Using Tare
You fill containers with your products or customers bring their own
container. The tare function makes sure that only the goods are entered
and paid. If you know the weight of your containers, you can enter the tare weight
via the keyboard. So you do not have to tare the empty container.

Taring an empty container
1. Place the empty container on the scale.
2. Press the Tare key.
The weight display is reset to 0.000 and the NET symbol appears.
The tare weight is displayed in the bottom line of the display.
3. Fill the container with the goods to be weighed.
4. Carry out pricing as described above.
5. Remove the container from the scale.
All displays return to 0.

Keyboard Tare
1. Input the known tare value and press the Tare key.
The input tare value is displayed in the bottom line of the display and the PT cursor is lit.
The weight display shows the negative tare value.
2. Place the item with container or wrapping material onto the scale.
3. Carry out pricing as described above.
4. Remove the item with container or wrapping material from the scale.
All displays return to 0.

NEW PRODUCT! Ohaus Aviator 7000 Retail Scale

Over the years the Ohaus line of retail price computing scales has been a pretty solid choice for customers looking for a reliable, high quality scale. Of course the predecessor of the Ohaus RE15US and RE30US was the old XRT series scales. And of course before that we had the Tiger II scale. And finally before that it was the 8433 scale. All of those were nice scales that were fairly simple to use and they just worked. In fact, if you look closely, you’ll still see an old 8433 still in action at some small farmers market. Recently, we received word that Ohaus was going to be upgrading their retail scale lineup and replacing the RE and RA series.  Below is a summary of the new scale and a link on where to purchase the new scale.

The Ohaus Aviator 7000 retail scale has been conceived to offer optimum quality versus price in order to guarantee the robustness, operating speed and accuracy you need, whatever your retail environment. The Light-Touch layer keyboard is setting standards thanks to its fast operation, easy cleaning and cost efficiency, while the large 4-line LCD including separate tare line makes daily tasks simple. For secure and easy transportation the Aviator 7000 includes practical design features such as Ergo grips and integrated cable storage. In addition it offers POS protocol support. Overall the Aviator 7000 offers you a complete package of features rarely seen on an entry level price-computing scale – ensuring that it stands out from the crowd.

Key Features and Benefits of the Aviator 7000
Two Model Options and Several Weighing Ranges
Aviator® 7000 is available as a compact or tower model. Both models are available in the following dual weighing ranges: 15 x 0.005 lb / 30 x 0.01 lb and 30 x 0.01 lb / 60 x 0.02 lb. Continue reading

Commercial Scales for the Farmers Market Can Cost over $400

Legal for Trade Commercial scales can cost well over $400, but if you do a little research, you won’t pay near that much for a set of high quality farmers market scales.  Yes, you could get away with using a set of “household” scales, either hanging or digital, but that is ultimately not the way to establish trust and legitimacy with your customer who is buying produce from you.

Do some research and buy a legal for trade price computing scale that can be certified by the state.  In most states it is a requirement.  However, sometimes due to budget restraints and manpower, merchants get the idea that they can get away with not purchasing a legal for trade scale.  Sometimes every now and then you hear comments Continue reading

Spring time is almost here

We mentioned this back in January and we want to emphasize it one more time. This month is a great time to take out your old faithful price computing scale and give it a good work out. Plug it in and make sure it powers up and charges if it has a battery. It might even be a good idea to order a spare battery to prepare for the spring. Make Continue reading